Tip: Flyaway Hair


I think most of us suffer from flyaway hair. I'm not really talking about frizz, as such, but more static. Static is one of those things that I seem to suffer from on most days, and I can only assume that it's because my hair is so fine.  Something I read some time ago, suggested that static is due to the hair being "over-processed" or just too dry, which is why I decided to put this to the test and my solution does appear to work "most" of the time. As you can imagine, no tip is perfect, and probably won't be ideal for everyone. However, if you do suffer from static and you tend to straighten your hair, or curl it, quite a lot, then I really do recommend giving this a try. But, I most essentially recommend it to anyone who has fine hair.

One of the biggest causes of static, for me, has definitely been my hair straighteners, and it got me thinking about how drying this must be on my hair, especially with all that heat that I'm putting on my hair. The problem is, that not only do I have fine hair, but I also have greasy hair, so using Hair Serums is typically not an option for me, because they just leave my hair feeling gross.

A long time ago, I read a tip somewhere that suggested that if you are planning to straighten your hair, it is not recommended to blow dry your hair, but that you should allow it to dry naturally. Of course, for most of us, this just isn't realistic, so the idea was that if you do have to dry your hair pre-straightening, you should only dry it to roughly 80%. It's hard to know exactly what they meant by this, but I always try to leave my feeling damp, but very nearly dry.

The problem that I've always had with this piece of advice, has been that I remember reading somewhere that you should never straighten wet hair, because it damages your tresses. However, with hair straighteners that are specifically designed for wet hair, I'm always confused by that piece of information.

However, I have noticed that since I stopped drying my hair completely, with my hair dryer, straightening does appear to create much less static, which is fantastic.

So, the tip here really is:

To avoid static:
Don't completely dry your hair before straightening. 

This entry was posted on Saturday, 17 March 2012 and is filed under . You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response.

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